Council of Independent Colleges Historic Campus Architecture Project

 

 
Leonard Hall

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Institution Name: Kenyon College
Original/Historic Place Name: Leonard Hall
Location on Campus: 204 College-Park St.
Date(s) of Construction and Designer(s):
1923-1924original construction Garfield, Abram
1988renovation Unknown
Type of Place: Individual building
Style(s): (Glossary)
Materials:
Foundation: stone
Walls: stone
Roof: slate
 
    Function:
1924-presentresidence hall

Significance:
Landmark designation:
National RegisterKenyon College (1975)
Narrative: see below
References: see below
 

Narrative:
Leonard Hall, which was named for William A. Leonard, Episcopal bishop of Ohio, and his wife, was the first building at Kenyon to be designed by architect Abram Garfield, a son of U.S. President James A. Garfield. Its exterior is notable for the series of three-story bays ranging across its front and for the beautiful stonework, which includes intricate carvings surrounding the exterior doors. The most striking features of the building's interior are to be found in the fourth-floor lounges, with their sloped ceilings and paneled walls.

At the time of its completion in 1924, Leonard Hall allowed all of the College's students to be accommodated on campus for the first time in some years. The building has traditionally housed three of Kenyon's fraternities: Beta Theta Pi, Delta Tau Delta, and Psi Upsilon. It is now home to some members of those fraternities as well as independent students of both sexes. It should be noted that the College's fraternities have always been housed in residence halls, with some maintaining non-residential "lodges" in the wooded areas surrounding the campus for their various rites and some social functions. These lodges range in style from rustic cottages to small Gothic and Greek Revival temples.

The building is currently in good condition. It was most recently renovated in 1988.
 

References:
I. Bibliographic sources:

Greenslade, Thomas Boardman. Kenyon College: Its Third Half-Century. Gambier, OH: Kenyon College, 1975.

Siekkinen, George. Kenyon College. National Register of Historic Places designation report. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior/National Park Service, 1975.

Smythe, George Franklin. Kenyon College: Its First Century. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1924.

Stamp, Tom. "This Will Do." Kenyon College Alumni Bulletin 22, no. 1 (Spring 2000).

II. Location of other data:
University: Special Collections, Facilities Management Office
SHPO
Government Offices
 

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